“A SWEET Guide To Help You Navigate Breast Cancer & Sugar.”

Sugar, in all its stark white, sparkling glory is an enormously popular, widely misunderstood, and hotly-debated topic in the breast cancer world.

Rarely a week passes when I don’t hear or read “Sugar feeds breast cancer” proclaimed with absolute certainty. People appear to accept this declaration as truth, yet I ask; does it really? With October host to the annual convergence of breast cancer awareness AND Halloween, I think now is the perfect time for sprinkling sweet words of wisdom to my readers about this ubiquitous ingredient we love to hate and debate.

Before we dive in, let me make one thing clear. When I write about nutrition and food, the first thing I do is hit the research. I’m a dietitian. I have a bachelor of science degree in nutrition. I will say this until the day I leave this earth – nutrition is a science, not an opinion. While everyone rightly deserves their own opinion about nutrition (and food), I’m not “everyone.” I’m a nutrition professional AND a breast cancer survivor. I have a professional obligation to write from the science, and a personal obligation to share evidence-based nutrition information that serves the breast cancer community. I take both very seriously.

That said, I asked myself what non-sugar-coated nutrition information would be most helpful for someone newly diagnosed with breast cancer, feeling frustrated and confused because she couldn’t get a straight answer about whether sugar helps or harms, and grappling with “must I completely avoid sugar to keep the cancer from growing?” or “is it even possible to eat sugar and be as healthy as I can right now?” between the time of diagnosis and start of treatment.

What would someone want to know, who perhaps doesn’t give a rats ass about the science, but did hear (somewhere) that sugar does indeed drive cancer growth? Someone who wants a definitive and reliable answer, yet because overwhelm and impatience have become forces of nature, and an inability to focus has rendered the inclination to sift through pages of (conflicting) online nutrition information as appealing and effective as herding cats, she just wants to be told what to do.

Start Here. . .

There are literally hundreds of studies and reams of information on sugar and breast cancer; there’s no way I could possibly cover it all in this single blog. I’ll continue to write about this topic, but for today, here are my goals:

  • Provide a quick “Carbohydrates 101.”
  • Give you a tiny taste of the current research/science.
  • Provide a sweet guide to help you put this information into practice.

A Little Carbohydrate Background

Carbohydrates are one of three macronutrients (protein and fat are the other two) necessary in the diet to support energy, growth, and life, and include a wide range of starches, sugars and fiber. Some sugars are NATURALLY OCCURRING, like the sugar found in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and some dairy products. Other sugars, such as high fructose corn syrup, are produced commercially and then ADDED to foods.

“Carbohydrate” is a category that includes a wide range of starches, sugars (both naturally occurring and commercially produced), and fiber. There are many types of sugar, which are classified by chemists according to their chemical structure, i.e. monosaccharides (single, simple sugars) and disaccharides (two simple sugars joined together), and several forms of sugar, i.e. glucose, fructose and galactose, which come together to create even more forms of sugar, like the lactose in milk (glucose + galactose), and the maltose found in molasses (glucose + glucose.)

The concern for newly diagnosed and metastatic patients is that sugar “feeds” cancer, making it grow faster and uncontrollably, hastening its potential and/or further spread throughout the body. For patients undergoing treatment, there may be concern that sugar interferes with chemo and/or radiation. For women without a breast cancer diagnosis or are “NED” (no evidence of disease) post-treatment, the concern is that sugar will “cause” a cancer diagnosis or recurrence.

A (very small) Taste of The Current Research

  1. Including “naturally occurring” sugars in your diet from fruits, vegetables, whole grains and dairy (i.e. PLAIN cow’s milk versus chocolate or other “flavored” milks which have ADDED sugar) is an eating pattern you can feel comfortable about. These naturally sweet (or “savory” whole grain) foods not only provide energy-rich carbohydrates, they’re loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and phytochemicals versus only the empty calories of most added sugars. (1)
  2. Sugar does indeed feed cancer cells, as well as ALL of your other cells. Every cell in your body uses glucose (the “broken down” form of carbohydrate) for energy. Even on a no/low carbohydrate diet, your body transforms protein and fat into usable glucose (blood sugar) to support the function of your brain (which can use ONLY carbohydrate for energy) and all your other tissues.
  3. Because cancer cells are especially “hungry and hyperactive,” they consume glucose more quickly than non-cancerous cells. With the help of a radioactive compound very SIMILAR to glucose that allows detection of the metabolic activity (hungriness and hyperness) of cancer cells, medical professionals are able to see this phenomenon during a PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scan.
  4. Cells use sugar like cars use gasoline. Normal cells use a reasonable amount of gas, but because cancer cells divide at faster rates than normal cells, they’re gas (sugar) guzzlers. (2)
  5. Compelling epidemiologic studies have shown that dietary sugar intake has a significant impact on the development of breast cancer, but the data is inconsistent and the mechanism is unclear. One proposed mechanism for how sugar impacts breast cancer is through inflammation (obesity is a strong driver of systemic inflammation.) In one study, sugar did accelerate and promote the development of breast cancer in mice fed the equivalent of the average sugar consumption by the American population – 70 pounds/person/year according to this particular study – through changes in metabolic signaling pathways and the expression and production of certain proteins linked to the inflammatory response. Takeaway: sugar DID NOT DIRECTLY cause breast cancer, rather, it exerted influence on a particular signal and pathway involved in promoting its development. (3)
  6. Another very small study, again, done on mice and only certain types of breast cancer cells in culture and for select chemo medications, indicated that sugar may interfere with the body’s response to and effectiveness of chemotherapy, calling for further investigation to achieve definite outcomes and practices for real-life applications. (4)
  7. When carbohydrates are eaten, the body increases its output of insulin to help return post-meal blood sugar levels to normal. Failure of insulin levels to return to normal after the blood sugar is cleared indicates insulin resistance and high levels of insulin remaining in the blood. Insulin resistance can result from obesity and inactivity; insulin resistance is associated with higher breast cancer recurrence risk. (5)

A SWEET Guide To Help You Navigate Sugar Challenges

  • Aim to keep your ADDED sugar intake to 10% or less of the TOTAL calories you eat daily:
    • For example, if you eat 2,000 calories per day, all the calories you eat from ADDED sugar for the entire day would equal 200 calories. Remember, that’s CALORIES not grams, there’s a difference (see below.)
  • Added sugars are found in:
    • candy, cookies, cake, pie, brownies, muffins, sweet rolls and pastry, ice cream, sorbet, gelato, sweetened beverages like juice-drinks, fruit punch, sports drinks, sweetened iced tea, bottled smoothies, soda and coffee drinks, cereals, some breads, ketchup, barbeque sauce, spaghetti and tomato sauces, flavored milks (plant-based and cow), flavored yogurt, protein and cereal bars, salad dressing, canned baked beans (this is NOT a definitive list – check your ingredient labels!)
  • 1 gram of sugar has 4 calories:
    • If a food label shows 5 grams of sugar in one serving, that food gives you 20 calories of sugar (5 grams x 4 calories.)
  • When choosing packaged foods, look at the “ingredients” label.
    • If you see any of the following terms, you’ll know there is ADDED sugar: brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, fructose, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, invert sugar, malt syrup, maltose, molasses, raw sugar, sucrose, trehalose, turbinado sugar.

What 200 calories/day of Added Sugar Looks Like

Breakfast

  • 1 packet instant maple and brown sugar oatmeal; 12 grams sugar (48 calories from sugar)
  • 1 cup vanilla almond milk; 13 grams sugar (52 calories from sugar)

Lunch

  • 2 tablespoons honey dijon dressing; 5 grams sugar (20 calories from sugar)
  • Mixed greens salad with 1 ounce candied walnuts and 2 tablespoons dried cranberries; 9 grams sugar + 13 grams sugar (88 calories from sugar)

Surprise! You’re already at 208 calories from sugar and your day’s not even over.

This example isn’t meant to prevent you from eating ANY added sugar, rather, to give you an idea of how added sugars can creep in without you being aware. This is an easy fix!

Fix It Like This. . .

Choose plain instant oatmeal and add 1 teaspoon honey, use plain (no-sugar-added) vanilla almond milk. Add olive oil and balsamic vinegar to your salad, raisins vs dried cranberries (raisins have natural vs. added sugar) and non-sugared, toasted walnuts.

Sources

  1. “Does Sugar Feed Cancer?” 
  2. “Does Sugar Feed Cancer? It’s Not That Simple.”
  3. “Dietary sugar induces tumorigenesis in mammary gland partially through 12 lipoxygenase pathway”
  4. “Modification of dietary sugar on the chemotherapeutic potential in breast cancer”
  5. “Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Insulin”

If you want more nutrition and breast cancer information and updates on programs and services, shoot me an email at cathy@cathyleman.com.

I’ll subscribe you to my weekly newsletter, and as a thank you, send along my “25 Ways To Strike Back At Breast Cancer.”

And you can follow me here:

Twitter: @cathylemanrd

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eatwellgetstrong/

Easy. Peasy. 

“29 Foods to Help You Manage Breast Cancer Stress”

Stress is insidious.

It weasels in even when you think you have a handle on it, wreaking havoc on your sleeping patterns, waking hours productivity, and at the cellular and hormonal level, your body’s immune system and regenerative ability.

There’s all sorts of stress to contend with on a daily basis; traffic stress, late-for-work stress, forgot-our-anniversary-now-you’re-really-mad-at-me stress. It can be endless.

Every person copes with stress in their own way, and we all perceive stress differently. For example, that thing stressing out your best friend may not raise even a blip on your stress radar, and vice versa. But the thing guaranteed to trigger a massive stress response in anyone?

Hearing “It is breast cancer.”

It’s an experience I can only describe as feeling like your brain is stuffed into a box in a separate room, completely detached from your body, yet still trying desperately to keep up with and process the information being relayed.

So what actually DOES happen to your body when you’re exposed to the complex phenomenon of stress? Your body’s wondrous physiology behaves in a fairly coordinated manner by activating something called a “stress response,” a series of reactions involving hormones, behavioral changes, and alterations in the functioning of your autonomic system (the mechanism by which body processes like breathing and heart rate work without conscious effort.)

Back to that concept of coping mechanisms, one very good (universal) solution for managing breast cancer stress, is to eat a stress fighting diet. Not, mind you, a macaroni-and-cheese-at-every-meal kind of stress fighting diet – that’s more of a stress numbing diet – and perfect fodder for another blog post.

The diet I’m talking about is one that confers powerful stress reducing benefits that: improve brain functioning, prop up your immune system, lower blood pressure, promote optimal circulation, reduce free radicals and other toxins, minimize cortisol and adrenaline levels, the stress chemicals that trigger our fight or flight response.

Yes, food can do all of that.

“Now, more than ever, eating nutrient-dense food to support your body’s ability to handle stress at the cellular level is essential for your overall well-being. Not only that, eating for stress reduction and management helps reduce recurrence risk and revs up your energy levels.” – Cathy Leman, MA, RD, LD

Here’s a list of 29 foods that get into your cells and do the good work!

Happy eating. . .

  • Vitamin C fruits and veggies
    • Green and red peppers, potatoes, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, tomatoes, kiwi, cauliflower, cabbage, onions
  • Vitamin E foods
    • Dry roasted sunflower seeds, almonds, spinach, safflower oil, wheat germ, green leafy vegetables
  • Polyphenolic foods
    • Chocolate, tea, coffee
  • Complex carbohydrate foods
    • Barley, rye, oats, whole wheat
  • Omega 3 foods
    • Walnuts, ground flax seeds, fatty fish, chia seeds, canola oil

Want more breast cancer nutrition, fitness and lifestyle inspiration and information that you can’t get here? Go to www.cathyleman.com and subscribe to my newsletter!

“3 Breast Cancer Diets That Harm Not Heal”

Loss of control.

That feeling shows up front and center on the heels of a breast cancer diagnosis so darn quickly I feel as if the doctor delivering the “It is cancer” news should in the same breath say, “For the rest of your life, please prepare to surrender any assumptions that you ever held even a modicum of control over your health – you foolish woman.”

Feeling like you’ll never regain your equilibrium, you search desperately for the first thing that hints even slightly of an ability to ground and balance you.

For many women, that “first thing” is food.

This topic is one of my areas of expertise, one I’ll continue to write broadly about, but today I address how a well-intentioned effort at “helping” can be misguided at best, dangerous at worst, and share wisdom for finding true nutritional balance laced with compassion and understanding.

The “F*#! You” Diet

Also known as the “What The Hell” diet, this is the nutrition plan you choose once you’ve determined that it really doesn’t matter what you eat because everything causes breast cancer, that healthy diet you (sort of) ate before your diagnosis failed you, and honestly, you simply no longer give a f*#!

It takes every ounce of energy to wrap your mind around the fact that you actually have breast cancer, and the upcoming surgery and treatment is stressing you out so much you tranquilize yourself with your favorite “foods-that-never-fail-to-comfort”; heavy on the sweets and chips, hold the broccoli.

It takes too much energy to cook, grocery shopping is impossible to squeeze in between the ridiculous number of medical appointments now crowding your calendar, and even if you were to consider preparing a meal, you suddenly have cooking amnesia. What in the world could you possibly make, as distracted as you are by your diagnosis?

It would require a preternatural act of God to muster up the concentration necessary to chop, stir, heat, measure and blend – who could possibly cook at a time like this? Besides, you’re so angry about the whole thing, that time alone in the kitchen could very well result in shattered glass, busted dishware, and an unhealthy obsession with that pantry shelf where you hide all the junky snacks.

Take out, drive through, and microwave meals become your staples, and there isn’t enough ice cream on the planet to calm you down. 

___________

WISDOM: Chances are, even before your breast cancer diagnosis, you turned to food to soothe, support, and save you. While it’s true food can serve as a reliable, readily accessible, cheap and legal way to feel better fast, it wasn’t a healthy solution before your diagnosis, and it’s even less so now. Research shows that nutrition has a positive impact on treatment outcomes and in reducing risk of recurrence, so that “everything causes breast cancer” adage just doesn’t hold up.

You have every right to be angry, yet taking that anger out on yourself through a full-on “Eff-U”approach to eating is a classic example of cutting off your nose to spite your face. You may FEEL better (briefly) after pounding down an entire pound cake, but is it possible that the relief comes more from the distraction the cake provides? Of course! It’s so much easier to push reality to the edges of your mind when you’re busy shoving forkful after forkful of food into your mouth.

Can you list three non-food ways to manage your anger without sending your blood sugar skyrocketing and your GI tract into spasms?

Example: Acknowledge the anger and panic; order a stand-up punching bag pronto.

  1. ____________________________________________
  2. ____________________________________________
  3. ____________________________________________

The “Beyond Perfection” Diet

Every. Single. Bite. Must. Be. Squeaky. Clean. You’ve taken nutritious eating to an extreme; even organic isn’t quite organicky enough.

This is the nutrition plan you choose when you just know that the healthier and cleaner your diet is, the better off your health, treatment outcome, and recurrence risk will be. How dare breast cancer even consider ever again invading your body (once you’ve had that surgery and whatever treatment lies ahead) with the ironclad, super-clean diet you’ve adopted.

Your refrigerator and pantry are packed with maca and matcha, greens and grains, berries and broccoli, and you’ve determined the exact ratio and variety of whole foods necessary to maintain the perfect level of alkalinity required to keep breast cancer at bay.

You’re devouring every nutrition and cancer book you can get your hands on, counting macros, measuring antioxidant levels of local versus imported red grapes, and undertaking an exhaustive comparison of all varieties of rooibos tea.

Regardless of whether you’re at a party, a restaurant (who knows what’s really in that food?), or simply the grocery store, if you can’t get the “perfect” clean food – you simply won’t eat – you’re too terrified that one bite of a conventional carrot will send your cancer everywhere.

This is POISON, just POISON!

Funnily enough, all of that reading has failed to turn up the word “orthorexia”, the one term that offers a slightly different perspective, and something to consider in chasing diet perfection. 

_____________

WISDOM: Let me be perfectly clear. There is NOTHING wrong with the intention to uplevel your nutrition at this time; in fact, I highly recommend it. The trouble comes when an obsession with perfection overrides the sensibility of simply nourishing your body well enough to withstand treatment and improve outcomes. Nutrition isn’t as black and white, good food/bad food-focused as the cancer nutrition books and websites would have you believe, so working to find the gray that allows you to actually live your life is a worthy endeavor.

While exciting research continues in the discovery of certain foods that confer promising benefits for breast cancer risk reduction and potentially even prevention, here’s the most important thing to remember: “No single food or meal can cause or prevent cancer, and no “diet” is bulletproof. Increase fruits and vegetables (conventional is fine if organic isn’t in your budget), eat more plant-based proteins like beans, legumes, soy, nuts and seeds, add whole grain options like brown rice and whole-wheat pasta, and don’t forget to serve yourself an enormous helping of satisfaction and enjoyment with your meal.”

The “Supplements as Food” Diet

Eat actual food? No. Absolutely not.

This is the nutrition plan you choose once you’ve determined that you simply can’t trust food to keep you healthy. With your breast cancer diagnosis, you’re living proof. You’ve been advised by your ___________________(fill in with questionable website, book, unscrupulous practitioner, etc.) to drink a certain tea, blend and consume a special powder, swallow a particular combination of supplements, and fast every other day.

Food is the enemy, and the breast cancer cure lies in spending time (not to mention untold sums of money) preparing special tinctures and potions. The mixing and monitoring and timing of things takes your mind off the impending surgery and treatment, and you feel confident that this is the best approach to nourishing your body – regardless of what your oncologist or breast surgeon thinks.

Enjoying a restaurant meal with friends is out of the question, you’re dropping weight faster than you care to think about, and your energy is flagging. But hey, this plan is supposed to keep the breast cancer away and that’s enough “evidence” for you.

_____________

WISDOM: Right now, you are quite possibly the most vulnerable to nutritional chicanery you’ve ever been. The term “snake oil” wouldn’t be a stretch to describe some of the unscrupulous recommendations easily available with the click of a mouse and the entering of a credit card number – and they’re looking for YOU!

Don’t be fooled. Actual food, with its synergy of nutrients and health properties can never be replaced with a supplement regimen. There’s nothing wrong with learning which supplements may complement your nutritional regimen, but in the end, please remember there’s a reason they’re called SUPPLEMENTS. . .they’re the supporting cast, not the diet lead.

“Introducing. . .Breast Cancer PREHAB.”

It was time to cry uncle.

Over the long Labor Day weekend I was not physically idle for a second (sleeping doesn’t count), and neither was my mind.

I’d been chewing on an issue that just wouldn’t leave me alone – the question of how to wrap my mind around all of the scientific information on breast cancer nutrition, fitness and lifestyle, package it up neatly, and present it to women who need it most in a timely, orderly, succinct yet engaging, ongoing message of love, support and inspiration. You’d think that would be fairly simple to accomplish, yes?

Ambitious, yes. Simple, no.

While writing my weekly blog over the last few months, sifting through topics relevant to the breast cancer community and working to develop content for my “still-in-progress-new-website”, one thing became excruciatingly clear. All of that scientific information is exciting and relevant, yet the sheer volume is enough to overwhelm, stymie forward motion, and bury me alive.

So what to do?

Well, go to the Morton Arboretum and run laps, of course. It was Saturday morning, and somewhere around the third mile I had the aha moment I’d been searching for.  

PREHAB.

That was it. Breast cancer PREHAB.

Shortly after my diagnosis I read this exact article in CURE magazine and remember thinking, “THIS. RIGHT. HERE. This is what women need to know about and take action on. This will help them.”

I also recalled the two most common challenges shared by the 140 survivors I surveyed on breast cancer and nutrition; and they both occur at the time of diagnosis:

  1. “I want to know what I should be eating and how I should change my diet, but I don’t know who to trust. Online sources give conflicting information, and my doctor said: a) nutrition doesn’t matter, b) you can eat anything you want,             c) he/she doesn’t know enough about nutrition to help me.”
  2. “What should I eat (or not) to reduce my risk of recurrence.”

My survey asked nutrition questions only, yet in the time since gathering that feedback I’ve had multiple exchanges with members of the breast cancer community about exercise and fitness; specifically, how best to use physical activity to improve treatment outcomes and yes, that hot topic. . .reduce risk of recurrence.

So there you have the eureka moment those running endorphins churned up for me;  focusing my efforts and work on the PREHAB space, an area of breast (and other) cancer interest currently in its infancy, yet steadily gaining ground.

So What Is Breast Cancer Prehab?

The idea of prehab as a proactive approach to avoid pain and injury is a familiar concept in the world of physical therapy, not yet so much in the breast cancer world, which makes education on what prehab is, its value and benefit, and what can be gained from taking action at the time of diagnosis imperative. Breast cancer prehab isn’t so much about avoiding pain and injury, but more about building physical resilience and strength to better withstand the rigorous demands on the body (and mind) of breast cancer treatment; surgery, chemotherapy and radiation are all trauma to the body, so the concept of prehab posits that the more resilient one is going in, the better the outcome.

While “prehab” may conjure up only a physical component, nutritional counseling and education, and even psychological support have also shown to contribute to positive outcomes.

Another thing I love about breast cancer prehab is that the concepts translate far beyond the time of a diagnosis to support a reduction in risk of recurrence, survivorship, or living with metastatic breast cancer. The guidelines for prehab – education on how to uplevel nutrition and fitness to build physical resilience – apply even for women who haven’t been diagnosed as a focus on prevention.

675 women PER DAY are diagnosed with breast cancer. The collateral damage (to use a phrase coined by Dr. Susan Love) in terms of physical limitations, psychological impact, and negative outcomes on energy, stamina, immune system health and a host of other physiological issues post-treatment is colossal. The opportunity to help lessen that burden with actionable tools and services is exciting and humbling.

My blog will continue to address a wide variety of breast cancer nutrition/fitness/lifestyle topics, all supporting the idea of taking action; which I hope I’ve convinced you is especially important at that critical time of diagnosis.

Stay tuned, big things are coming!

“Even before treatment starts, you can help the healing process begin.”                                                                            – Cathy Leman, MA, RD, LD

If you’d like to learn more, these are good places to start:

  1. “Patients Do Better After Surgery If They Do Prehab First”
  2. “Cancer Prehabilitation Important Lessons From a Best Practices Model”
  3. To Boost Patient Health, Rehab Sometimes Starts Before Cancer Treatment

 

 

 

Sweet Potato Chickpea Pasta Sauce

I love opening my refrigerator door, taking a quick inventory of what’s hanging around, and conjuring up a way to combine the remains of the week’s meals into something new, nourishing, and delicious.

This week’s fridge review yielded leftover whole wheat pasta, two sweet potatoes, and garbanzo beans (chickpeas). I closed the refrigerator door and left to run Saturday errands – but in the back of my mind the assembly was already coming together.

What if I sautéed onion and garlic for extra flavor (and nutrition!), blended the sweet potatoes and garbanzo beans with veggie broth, swirled in the marinara, and served it over the pasta? Bingo.

Here’s a video showing the collection of ingredients I had to work with. Normally, I would simply dump the garbanzo’s, sweet potatoes, and some broth together in my NutriBullet and blend until it “looked right”, but I wanted to portion it out to give you exact amounts so you could recreate.

First I sautéed the onion until soft, THEN added the garlic. You don’t want to burn the garlic (gets bitter), so I find cooking the onions first and then dumping the garlic on top a good way to avoid that.

Onions and garlic sautéing in olive oil.

Next, I blended the sweet potato, chickpeas, and vegetable broth to create a smooth, silky mixture. I used Engine 2 Plant-Strong Organic Vegetable Stock because it’s “low sodium” claim truly is low; only 35 mg sodium per 1 cup! I love that, because when I don’t have homemade veg broth available I want a convenient option that doesn’t compromise nutrition.

I added the blended chickpea/sweet potato mixture to the onions and garlic, stirred it all together well, then swirled in the marinara (use the lowest sodium, no sugar or “extra” ingredients brand you can find!):

It. Was. Delicious.

Success!

And seriously, it was QUICK, I set my phone timer when I started. Here’s a screenshot to show you it took only 16 minutes and 49 seconds. Obviously that’s not including the time it took me to portion the ingredients, but it includes chopping the onion and garlic, the blenderizing, and combining!

Preparing the sautéed beet greens and spinach side dish (see below) took a little extra time, maybe 10 minutes. Also doesn’t include clean up – but my husband does that, LOL!

Regardless, you could make this sauce in ~20 minutes then store it for later. Timesaver!!

Here’s a pic of the finished meal – it truly was so good, and we even have leftovers. Find the recipe below – enjoy!

Beet greens and spinach sautéed in olive oil and (lots of!) chopped garlic.

Sweet Potato and Chickpea Pasta Sauce

1 medium white or yellow onion, diced

2 large cloves garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup cooked sweet potato (2 medium)

3/4 cup chickpeas (garbanzo beans)

1 3/4 cup low sodium vegetable broth

1 1/2 cup low sodium marinara sauce (I like Trader Joes’s organic no salt added)

Sprinkle of Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

_________________

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet (I like to use cast iron; adds iron to the dish), then add the onion, a sprinkle of Kosher salt and a few grinds of fresh black pepper. Sauté the onion until soft, then mix in the garlic and cook for another minute.
  2. While the onion/garlic mixture cooks, blend the garbanzo beans, sweet potato, and vegetable broth together in a high-powered blender (I use my NutriBullet).
  3. Add the sweet potato/garbanzo bean mixture to the onion/garlic mixture, blend well and cook for ~2 minutes. Stir in the marinara sauce, heat through for ~5 minutes and serve over your favorite pasta, or cool to room temperature and refrigerate for later!